cinephilearchive
cinephilearchive:

“I wished to show people that I didn’t glow in the dark, you know. That I could say ‘action’ and ‘cut’ just like the rest of the fellows.” Anthony Veiller’s screenplay for ‘The Stranger’ (Orson Welles and John Huston uncredited.) Adapted by Victor Trivas and Decla Dunning. Story by Victor Trivas [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

Orson Welles may have claimed that he did the picture “to prove I could say ‘Action!’ and ‘Cut!’, just like all the other fellows,” but his other remark that “there is nothing of me in the picture” is clearly a nonsense. The Harper School bears a strong resemblance, much noted by his biographers, to Roger Hill’s Todd School in Woodstock, where the teenage Welles was so happy (a sign on the gym wall—this film, like ‘Touch of Evil,’ is full of handwritten signs—reveals the football coach as having the same names as his Todd counterpart), and the details of a small, cold New England town are created with a relish which, for all the unstressed astringency, may be love. As a portrait of a community, ‘The Stranger’ comes close to matching Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ (a film much admired by Welles), and we may also be reminded, as James Agee was by the Hitchcock, of the movies of that old Welles family friend (and potential leading man of the unmade Mercury production of ‘The Pickwick Papers’), W.C. Fields.
Continue reading at Parallax View

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. The best Film board on Pinterest? You betcha! Join us today. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going.

//

cinephilearchive:

“I wished to show people that I didn’t glow in the dark, you know. That I could say ‘action’ and ‘cut’ just like the rest of the fellows.” Anthony Veiller’s screenplay for ‘The Stranger’ (Orson Welles and John Huston uncredited.) Adapted by Victor Trivas and Decla Dunning. Story by Victor Trivas [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

Orson Welles may have claimed that he did the picture “to prove I could say ‘Action!’ and ‘Cut!’, just like all the other fellows,” but his other remark that “there is nothing of me in the picture” is clearly a nonsense. The Harper School bears a strong resemblance, much noted by his biographers, to Roger Hill’s Todd School in Woodstock, where the teenage Welles was so happy (a sign on the gym wall—this film, like ‘Touch of Evil,’ is full of handwritten signs—reveals the football coach as having the same names as his Todd counterpart), and the details of a small, cold New England town are created with a relish which, for all the unstressed astringency, may be love. As a portrait of a community, ‘The Stranger’ comes close to matching Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ (a film much admired by Welles), and we may also be reminded, as James Agee was by the Hitchcock, of the movies of that old Welles family friend (and potential leading man of the unmade Mercury production of ‘The Pickwick Papers’), W.C. Fields.

Continue reading at Parallax View

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. The best Film board on Pinterest? You betcha! Join us today. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going.

strangewood

When Stan Brakhage met Andrei Tarkovsky…
“So, the leader comes through, the room’s heated up, on comes Dog Star Man, Part IV. He starts exploding in Russian the minute the hand painted frames are flickering on the screen, along with the layers of superimposition. He’s obviously raging! No one’s heard him talk so much since he’s been here. He’s hammering away in incredibly rapid Russian. He ran, in the course of an hour and a half, through every argument against my work and any other individual’s work that I have ever heard, from the Emperor’s New Clothes argument through this-is-too-rapid-it-hurts-the-eyes, through ‘this is sheer self-indulgence,’ to ‘film is only a collaborative art.’ And in detail, ‘the color is shit’ and ‘what is this paint? Why do you do this?”
“In the mean time, Jane and his wife are laughing and they’re holding hands, and smiling, like ‘isn’t this a wonderful cock fight!’ Because I must say I gave for everything I got. I ran through my whole repertoire of any kind of answer I’d ever given in the briefest and simplest way I’ve ever done. I’ve had twenty-five years of practice in being beat up in public. At one point he lashed out in a diatribe against innovation itself, which I haven’t heard before and maybe the only place you could hear it from would be Russia. The Avant-Garde crowds I’ve played to never thought of that one.”
“Then, a further irony, we all had to sit there and watch a film by a Russian emigre that Tarkovsky had promised to watch. We had to endure a stupid, senseless movie in which the Russian girl who’s fat can’t get a boyfriend or adjust to America. It felt about ten hours long although it was only half an hour. I did hear afterwards that Tarkovsky told the Russian emigre that it was the stupidest film he ever saw.“
[Telluride Gold: Brakhage meets Tarkovsky]

When Stan Brakhage met Andrei Tarkovsky…

“So, the leader comes through, the room’s heated up, on comes Dog Star Man, Part IV. He starts exploding in Russian the minute the hand painted frames are flickering on the screen, along with the layers of superimposition. He’s obviously raging! No one’s heard him talk so much since he’s been here. He’s hammering away in incredibly rapid Russian. He ran, in the course of an hour and a half, through every argument against my work and any other individual’s work that I have ever heard, from the Emperor’s New Clothes argument through this-is-too-rapid-it-hurts-the-eyes, through ‘this is sheer self-indulgence,’ to ‘film is only a collaborative art.’ And in detail, ‘the color is shit’ and ‘what is this paint? Why do you do this?”

“In the mean time, Jane and his wife are laughing and they’re holding hands, and smiling, like ‘isn’t this a wonderful cock fight!’ Because I must say I gave for everything I got. I ran through my whole repertoire of any kind of answer I’d ever given in the briefest and simplest way I’ve ever done. I’ve had twenty-five years of practice in being beat up in public. At one point he lashed out in a diatribe against innovation itself, which I haven’t heard before and maybe the only place you could hear it from would be Russia. The Avant-Garde crowds I’ve played to never thought of that one.”

“Then, a further irony, we all had to sit there and watch a film by a Russian emigre that Tarkovsky had promised to watch. We had to endure a stupid, senseless movie in which the Russian girl who’s fat can’t get a boyfriend or adjust to America. It felt about ten hours long although it was only half an hour. I did hear afterwards that Tarkovsky told the Russian emigre that it was the stupidest film he ever saw.“

[Telluride Gold: Brakhage meets Tarkovsky]